Tea vs Coffee – Which saves more water?

I was surprised just how much water is saved if you switch from coffee to tea. According to GOOD, drinking one cup of tea instead of one cup of coffee can save 28 gallons of water!

I can only guess that takes into account all the water to grow the tea and coffee beans needed for one cup, as well as the water that goes into the production of the final product.

Here’s a little movie from GOOD that shows all the ways you can cut down on your water consumption throughout the day.

Via TreeHugger

The Urban Tea Merchant & Milky Oolong

Tea leaves

Recently I went to the Urban Tea Merchant in West Vancouver. I’ve been here before but this time was a bit different. In a good way. They’ve standardized on one tea brand, The Ô Dor.  While I will miss one of the other brands they used to carry, MARIAGE FRÈRES, I can get it at other places and The Ô Dor will give them a run for their money, if not beat them at their own game. It was probably a really smart move.

At the end of my lunch (which was delicious by the way), one of their lovely tea merchants, Reza, gave me a tour of some of their teas to introduce me to The Ô Dor. He was incredibly knowledgable about all the teas and the brand. He told me that the founder, Guillame Leleu, is one of the youngest people (26 when he founded the tea house) to pass the tea taster certification with as high of marks as he recieved.

I left with three teas to take home and sample:

  • THÉ DU LOUP – “The first creation of The Ô Dor, Tea of the Wolf. Flavours of chocolate and hazelnut with blended black teas from China and Ceylon. Considered by many as a perfectly natural anti-depressant, this warm source of stress-relief, summer and winter, will seduce the ladies as it will the gentlemen.” It certainly puts a smile on my face when I have it.
  • COÏNCIDENCE NOIR – “The Ô Dor wanted to propose a variation of a famous blend of tea for connoisseurs. For these enthusiasts, The Ô Dor has created a black tea, with captivating perfumes of the original creation, which is bound to attract attention.” It smells/tastes familiar, but I can’t place what it is.
  • CÉLÉBRATION – “Rich in flavours of cream, vanilla and roasted hazelnuts. A masterful creation to be enjoyed with or without milk. A true delight!” Mmmm…a lovely combination of flavors that I prefer with milk and sugar.

And there was one tea that I keep thinking about and am kicking myself for not getting while I was there – Milky Oolong. It’s a super rare mistake of a find. According to the story that was told to me, they were experimenting with the fermentation processes and decided to put it through the process one more time. And what they got was this devine tea that smells exactly like caramel, with tastes of vanilla and “milk with softness of voluptuous cream”. At $86/100 g, I’ll be getting just enough for 1 pot of tea next time.

One thing that they do that sounds like fun are the tea leaf readings every Monday night – but unfortunately I can’t get over there during the week.

I make it sound like The Urban Tea Merchant is hours away from me, but going across the Lions Gate Bridge is a bit of a commitment from Cambie Village. But luckily I won’t have to travel too far come November – they’re opening a location on Alberni St in Downtown Vancouver. And it’s only a few block from where I work. I’m sure I’ll be in there weekly, but I’ll have to hide the receipts from my lunch hour sojourns.

Conclusion: Check out The Urban Tea Merchant and the Milky Oolong.

THÉ DU LOUP

The first creation of The Ô Dor, Tea of the Wolf. This tea has now become a favorite masterpiece for all. Flavours of chocolate and hazelnut with blended black teas from China and Ceylon. Considered by many as a perfectly natural anti-depressant, this warm source of stress-relief, summer and winter, will seduce the ladies as it will the gentlemen.

Have you found the pefect tea cup?

I’ve been searching for the perfect tea cup. Everytime I’m I stumble upon a tea cup I have to check to see if its the elusive perfect tea cup. For me it has to have a

  • Wide top
  • Thin brim
  • Handle large enough to put a finger through
  • Handle shouldn’t feel like it’ll break if it I hold it too hard, but also not to thick
  • Well balanced
  • And, of course, an esthetically pleasing look

Various tea cups and saucers on market stall, close-upGiven that the Western world has been making tea cups for a few hundred years, you’d think I would have found one by now. But I haven’t. So what’s your favorite tea cup  – and why?